Framed Autographs Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan Scopes Monkey Trial
Framed Autographs Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan Scopes Monkey Trial
Framed Autographs Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan Scopes Monkey Trial
Framed Autographs Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan Scopes Monkey Trial
Framed Autographs Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan Scopes Monkey Trial
Framed Autographs Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan Scopes Monkey Trial

Framed Autographs Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan Scopes Monkey Trial

Regular price $1,500.00
Shipping calculated at checkout.

Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan framed Autographs

William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925), was elected to Congress in 1890, serving from 1891-1895. The Nebraska legislator soon became the acknowledged leader of the Free Silver Movement and, following his defeat for a Senate seat in 1894, returned to the private sector to wage his battle against proponents of the gold standard. As editor of the "Omaha World-Herald"

Darrow (1857-1938), who specialized in corporate law, shot to fame in 1894, when he defended American Socialist leader Eugene V. Debs, President of the American Railroad Union, arrested on a federal contempt of court charge arising from a strike at the Chicago Pullman Palace Car Company. Although Darrow lost the case, he won a national reputation as a champion of radical causes.

The Scopes Trial, formally known as The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes and commonly referred to as the Scopes Monkey Trial, was an American legal case in July 1925 in which a substitute high school teacher, John T. Scopes, was accused of violating Tennessee's Butler Act, which had made it unlawful to teach human evolution in any state-funded school.  The trial was deliberately staged in order to attract publicity to the small town of Dayton, Tennessee, where it was held. Scopes was unsure whether he had ever actually taught evolution, but he incriminated himself purposely so the case could have a defendant.

Beautifully framed using archival materials.  Measures approximately 18" x 18".